Pictures That Capture The Invisible Glow of Flowers Using UV

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Have you ever wondered what it would look like if you could see the world in Ultraviolet?

If you look at the flowers photographed by Craig Burrows, you get a glimpse of how it would be to see ultraviolet, visible fluorescence you might even feel transported into the alien world of James Cameron’s Avatar.

It’s nearly impossible to believe that this is not photo-shopped. The stark contrast petals brightly pigmented with contrast on a black backdrop with fireflies scatter across the blossom looks fictional but, in truth, its science.

Copyright ©Craig Burrows

Burrows uses a technique called ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence photography, or UVIVF. His process starts by mounting his floral subject to a metal stand and then by using a remote trigger to sound off a 10 to 20-second exposure by using ultraviolet light. The fluoresce becomes visible, like when you wear a t-shirt under UV light. 

Copyright ©Craig Burrows

Burrows explains that it’s not an easy type of photography as the smallest petal droop or air movement will result in motion blur.

Copyright ©Craig Burrows

“Reflected infrared and ultraviolet photography reveal secrets which we can’t see with the naked eye, but are very important in nature,” says Burrows. “I think it’s important that these things remind us to keep exploring and looking for things that go ignored or unobserved.”

Copyright ©Craig Burrows
Copyright ©Craig Burrows
Copyright ©Craig Burrows
Copyright ©Craig Burrows
Copyright ©Craig Burrows
Copyright ©Craig Burrows

Featured image Copyright ©Craig Burrows

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